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20120926
20121004
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for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
was assigned to conduct the first mission to china. largely because president nixon felt that if he went through regular channels, he would be overwhelmed with a lot of technical details on subjects he considered not up to the immediate challenge, and he could be sure i cannot overwhelm him with details. so when i first came to china, i had an experience which is perhaps unique in this sense -- every visitor to china would have killed for the privilege of meeting chairman mao. i was terrified of having to do it for the reason that i knew that president nixon wanted to be the first policymaker who met mao. i knew my life would not be worth living if i came back having done the first photograph of an american with chairman mao. chairman mao had given instructions that if i requested a meeting with him, i should be taken to him immediately. i went through enormous contortions not to request a meeting. [laughter] and so i achieved that goal of my visit. i've met, of course, each generation of chinese leaders. reflected theaem mission and the conditions of his period. mao was a revolutionary,
of history, this campaign is a lot like the 1960 race between kennedy and nixon. it is like the campaigns in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year very slowly and
to that that birth control access should be a non-partisan issue. president nixon signed title 10 into law. it was a republican value for less government intrusion in our lives and good, fiscal conservatism. $1 investment pays $4 in unnecessary costs. as we know today, social ideology is forcing some of our politicians to be more socially conservative and fiscally responsible because they recognize it is just good, public health. >> i get a little nervous about some of these responses, frankly. there is a tension between the government and the individual. it is in certain areas. i can practically agree with everything, but not absolutely. the government, at times, has to force employers to pay a minimum wage. the government has to force big companies -- the government has a lot of things that the government has to do. you live with this tension. be very careful. i think the best solution is a single-payer system. [applause] i have always said to my opponents, i never heard anybody, when they are getting on an airplane, saying, get the government off my back. [laughter] [applause] >> it bri
nixon. it's not balanced at all. after the shows are over, with the republican speaker that was just the white only lying. when you ask the house why they let them do it they say it's the only way they can get them on tv. you guys put up "the washington times." start with "the national enquirer." with all downhill from there. it's not exactly a newspaper. the media coverage got to be where they tell these people anything. that's all i have to say. host: up next, an independent from ohio. you are on c-span. first of all, are you a true independent? have you made a pure mind yet? -- your mind yet. caller: yes. i'm strictly for obama. romney, just like the previous caller said, he is nothing but strait lies. i'm going to be frank with you. i think half the country morons, illiterate, and flat out stupid. i pray for the country. the citizenry is dumb. they are flat out stupid. host: chances are we're going to get a response to that comment. caller: i hope so. maybe it will wait some of them up and have them read something and trying to understand. over half the country i think it's flat
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6